Art of Peace exhibition and events – paid commission for an actor/performer/dancer

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Margaux Portron, Research and Communications Associate, Artraker.

We are looking for a UK-based actor/performer/dancer for a paid commission as part of the most exciting project you’ll hear about this year!

Artraker is organising a series of events as part of the next Art of Peace exhibition, which will showcase the winners of Artraker 2016 Award in January 2017 in Central London.

We are looking for artists to perform and interpret political speeches related to war. Speeches have been chosen but the performance could take any form!

You will be paid and get a contract, as well as access to the Artraker network, a vibrant community of artists and policymakers.

Mohammed Kabir, 105 and some soldiers tend to the garden created by Kabir for their benefit. 'I'm a poor man but can live without food as long as I am surrounded by greenery and flowers,' he says. He attributes his youthful looks to working with nature. ‘Green is happiness, green is peace. Who doesn’t like that?' the soldiers say. Once considered to be a ‘City of Gardens’ nestled in the breadbasket of Central Asia, Kabul is struggling to define itself as a developing modern city in a maelstrom of pollution, traffic, road construction and security checkpoints not to mention the occasional insurgent attack and ongoing instability. But behind the razor wire and ten foot high walls of private residences are verdant serenities, a world a way from the bedlam outside as Afghans continue to keep the garden tradition alive.

Lalage Snow, “Paradise Lost”, photographs, 2010. Mohammed Kabir, 105 and some soldiers tend to the garden created by Kabir for their benefit.
‘I’m a poor man but can live without food as long as I am surrounded by greenery and flowers,’ he says. He attributes his youthful looks to working with nature.
‘Green is happiness, green is peace. Who doesn’t like that?’ the soldiers say.
Once considered to be a ‘City of Gardens’ nestled in the breadbasket of Central Asia, Kabul is struggling to define itself as a developing modern city in a maelstrom of pollution, traffic, road construction and security checkpoints not to mention the occasional insurgent attack and ongoing instability. But behind the razor wire and ten foot high walls of private residences are verdant serenities, a world a way from the bedlam outside as Afghans continue to keep the garden tradition alive.

Please send us an email at margaux(at)artraker.org, we look forward to hearing from you.

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